I found peas in the garden…

But not as many as I’d like so I sowed some more.

Grow well little peas, grow well!

Grow well little peas, grow well!

I made some me time today in the garden and it felt great.  The sun was shining and the birds were singing.  It even felt a little warm.  It is really strange because on days when it rains, you think “how can it ever be sunny again?”  On days like today it seems impossible that it could ever be miserable again.

Last of the summer peas

Last of the summer peas

I thought I’d start with something easy and gave the corn bed a hoe over, and then decided it would benefit from being forked over.  But I couldn’t find my fork.  It had been so long since I used it that I couldn’t remember where I left it, and knowing me it could have been anywhere!  I walked around and around the garden looking for it and decided this was just wasting time and I looked about for something else to do with my precious time.  I eventually found my fork.  It turned out it had fallen over where I had left it and the grass had grown over it.  Tripping over them is a most effective way to find lost forks.

A bit of a mess

A bit of a mess

I looked about again for something else to do – something that would make me feel like I had achieved something and the peas were calling out “pick me, pick me!”  Not because they needed harvesting, but they were in a dire state.  I had sowed a whole row some weeks back, but I had no idea how they were faring.  It turns out pretty badly.  Only about half a dozen had come up – or it is highly likely they came up, but the slugs got to them.  In the absence of the peas, weeds raised their ugly heads and the bed, while being a verdant green, not a lot of it was any good.

Untangle your tendrils

Untangle your tendrils

The old row from summer was still hanging in there, clinging to the net with brown and crispy tendrils.  They really should have been removed long ago.  So I took care of them.  And I did it with care.  Normally I just rip down the plants, take down the netting, bunch it all up, with dead and decaying foliage still clinging on, telling myself I’d sort it in the spring.  But experience has taught me it is far easier to remove the tendrils as best you can while the net is still hanging up, and that way any pests and disease have no home to overwinter in.

Then I folded the net as best I could and removed the poles and put everything away.  My spring self will thank me for it.

Pea-lings

Pea-lings

Then I weeded the entire bed, and rescued the wee pea-lings and thought safety in numbers and popped them into a very short row down one end.  The rest of the empty row was then replanted with fresh seeds and they were lovingly protected from the greedy gastropods with a liberal application of little blue pellets.

It is so reassuring to know that one of my 30+ beds is under control.  Peas rein in my garden once again.

Come again soon – I love the feeling of dirt under my nails – I must do it again tomorrow!

Sarah the Gardener  : o )

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16 Comments on “I found peas in the garden…

  1. Hi Sarah … I have peas growing too. thankfully those slimey molluscs have left mine well alone (fingers crossed). I too adore dirt under my nails – well that is until I attempt to remove it. At least I know then that I have been in my favourite place! 🙂

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    • HI Julie. I always feel a little despondent when I look down and see clean, unchipped nails. It means I haven’t been in the garden for way too long! The good thing is this is easily rectified by a bit of digging and then all is right with the world again!.
      Cheers Sarah : o )

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    • Hi. That is one of the beauties of gardening, is you can see where you have been. A weedy mess is soon turned into a lovely patch of bare earth just waiting for something to happen! It feels good. Accomplishment and promise all in the same action. Marvelous!
      Cheers Sarah : o )

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    • HI. We are fortunate enough here to be able to grow peas in spring and autumn. The boffins at the weather office are saying that it will be a mild (but wet) winter so I may be able to get away with growing them right through! Here’s hoping.
      Cheers Sarah : o )

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  2. I planted some peas not so long ago! Alas they didn’t come up, have you heard of a problem where seeds are out of date? Liking your work 🙂

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    • Out of date seeds are pretty hit-and-miss when it comes to germination. They don’t make for the strongest plants either. That said, sometimes they do come up and are fine

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    • Thanks Adam. Provided your seeds are stored correctly, they should be good for at least three years. I know what caused mine to fail to come up. They rotted in the ground. After I sowed them we had days and days of rain. The ideal pea planting process is to give the soil a really good drink and then sow the seeds and leave them until they pop up – unless it is exceptionally dry, then moisten the soil again. Peas and bean seeds really dont like wet soil.
      All the best with your next attempt with the peas – you wlll try again wont you?
      Cheers Sarah : o )

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  3. You and I appear to share the same method of finding our gardening tools 😛

    Can’t have a garden without a good supply of peas growing!

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    • Hi Rozzie. I really should look after my tools better, but if you are only going to get them out again the next day….
      The kids love having peas in the garden – they eat them like they are candy and that is good for me as I know they are eating good things. However it would be nice if they left enough for me to cook with!
      Cheers Sarah : o )

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  4. There is nothing quite like working in the garden on a beautiful day! It is good to know I am not the only one who puts something down only to spend undue amounts of time looking for it again.

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    • Hi Jessica. The thing that lurks in the back of my mind when something is lost is I hope I don’t run over it with the lawn mower and wreck both of them. I tend not to tell Hubby the Un-Gardener I’ve lost something or he will probably lecture me about the possibility of ruining the lawn mower!
      Cheers Sarah : o )

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    • Hi Anna. The garden always seems a little empty without peas in it. I love to snack on them as I garden and without them I’m left to snack on kale, spinach or turnips at this time of year. Although there are always carrots but they are so grubby in muddy soil.
      Cheers Sarah : o )

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